High-res In the midst of a major “copycat” lawsuit, Samsung has launched a site that highlights original design from the company. Emblazoned with the tagline “make it meaningful,” it’s described as “a platform to present influential design stories and solutions to be shared around the world.” It features explainers on what design is, and how it has the power to change our lives. It includes high-level explanations from Samsung designers and guest speakers like the Royal College of Art’s Dr. Nick Leon, who helps explain Samsung’s “Design Identity 3.0.”
Samsung launches website highlighting ‘meaningful’ design

In the midst of a major “copycat” lawsuit, Samsung has launched a site that highlights original design from the company. Emblazoned with the tagline “make it meaningful,” it’s described as “a platform to present influential design stories and solutions to be shared around the world.” It features explainers on what design is, and how it has the power to change our lives. It includes high-level explanations from Samsung designers and guest speakers like the Royal College of Art’s Dr. Nick Leon, who helps explain Samsung’s “Design Identity 3.0.”

Samsung launches website highlighting ‘meaningful’ design

How Microsoft’s Cortana compares to Siri and Google Now
From Readwrite:

Cortana, a new feature in Microsoft’s Windows Phone operating system, is both a search engine and a helper, just like its counterparts: Apple’s Siri and Google Now for Android. Cortana—who says she’s female, though not a woman—is Microsoft’s attempt to counter Google’s domination of Web search on smartphones while also serving as its counterpoint to the cheeky and informative Siri on the iPhone.
In this way, Cortana—like almost everything in Windows Phone—emerges as a combination of iOS and Android features embellished with some of Microsoft’s own unique elements.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

How Microsoft’s Cortana compares to Siri and Google Now

From Readwrite:

Cortana, a new feature in Microsoft’s Windows Phone operating system, is both a search engine and a helper, just like its counterparts: Apple’s Siri and Google Now for Android. Cortana—who says she’s female, though not a woman—is Microsoft’s attempt to counter Google’s domination of Web search on smartphones while also serving as its counterpoint to the cheeky and informative Siri on the iPhone.

In this way, Cortana—like almost everything in Windows Phone—emerges as a combination of iOS and Android features embellished with some of Microsoft’s own unique elements.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

High-res Images of an Amazon smartphone leak online
From BGR:

After years of development, Amazon is finally close to unveiling the first of several own-brand smartphones.

At a distance, Amazon’s upcoming flagship phone looks much like any other touchscreen phone on the market. But the company has spent years creating a unique and, at times, novel user experience that has two main focuses: Amazon products and services, and a custom 3D interface unlike anything we have seen before on a smartphone.
 And so begins the story of Amazon’s first smartphone.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Images of an Amazon smartphone leak online

From BGR:

After years of development, Amazon is finally close to unveiling the first of several own-brand smartphones.

At a distance, Amazon’s upcoming flagship phone looks much like any other touchscreen phone on the market. But the company has spent years creating a unique and, at times, novel user experience that has two main focuses: Amazon products and services, and a custom 3D interface unlike anything we have seen before on a smartphone.

And so begins the story of Amazon’s first smartphone.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

High-res Windows Phone 8.1: hands on with Microsoft’s latest OS update
From Engadget:

Even before today, Windows Phone only had a few big holes remaining and indeed, 8.1 appears to fill those gaps. In particular, the OS now has a fancy notification center in addition to those signature Live Tiles; the keyboard now allows for swipe gestures; and last but not least, it now has Cortana, a virtual assistant to take on Siri, Google Now and Samsung’s S Voice. The 8.1 update is a fairly significant one, and I got the opportunity to take it for a spin ahead of the official developer preview’s launch. It may not be perfect yet, but it’s clear Windows Phone has finally grown up.

Read more by clicking on the source link.
Image credit: CNET

Windows Phone 8.1: hands on with Microsoft’s latest OS update

From Engadget:

Even before today, Windows Phone only had a few big holes remaining and indeed, 8.1 appears to fill those gaps. In particular, the OS now has a fancy notification center in addition to those signature Live Tiles; the keyboard now allows for swipe gestures; and last but not least, it now has Cortana, a virtual assistant to take on Siri, Google Now and Samsung’s S Voice. The 8.1 update is a fairly significant one, and I got the opportunity to take it for a spin ahead of the official developer preview’s launch. It may not be perfect yet, but it’s clear Windows Phone has finally grown up.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Image credit: CNET

  • Engadget
High-res "When we blew through our goal and actually doubled it on the first day, you changed my life. I will never forget that. This is just the beginning of a long road towards our goal of rescuing the music, all of it, from Cab Calloway to Sinatra, the Beatles and Rolling Stones, to Nirvana and Patti Smith, to Jay Z and Rihanna, and beyond."
Neil Young on raising over $6 million during his Pono music player’s Kickstarter campaign.

"When we blew through our goal and actually doubled it on the first day, you changed my life. I will never forget that. This is just the beginning of a long road towards our goal of rescuing the music, all of it, from Cab Calloway to Sinatra, the Beatles and Rolling Stones, to Nirvana and Patti Smith, to Jay Z and Rihanna, and beyond."

Neil Young on raising over $6 million during his Pono music player’s Kickstarter campaign.

High-res At ATAP, simple things like Lego blocks represent ridiculously complex ideas. This tiny group of engineers and designers has given itself the task of creating a phone with several unproven, next-generation technologies. They intend to make a phone cheap enough to be accessible to 5 billion people. To do so, they need to create an ecosystem of hardware manufacturers robust enough that it could literally challenge giant incumbents like Foxconn and even Samsung. The head of Project Ara, Paul Eremenko, says he is planning “the most custom mass-market product ever created by mankind” without a trace of irony in his voice.
Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone

At ATAP, simple things like Lego blocks represent ridiculously complex ideas. This tiny group of engineers and designers has given itself the task of creating a phone with several unproven, next-generation technologies. They intend to make a phone cheap enough to be accessible to 5 billion people. To do so, they need to create an ecosystem of hardware manufacturers robust enough that it could literally challenge giant incumbents like Foxconn and even Samsung. The head of Project Ara, Paul Eremenko, says he is planning “the most custom mass-market product ever created by mankind” without a trace of irony in his voice.

Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone

High-res "We meant to validate Oculus by announcing Morpheus, and the Oculus guys knew what we were working on. I think they were waiting for us to make the announcement, so it would be Sony and Oculus together," he explains backstage at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. "But now Oculus being acquired by Facebook is helping to validate our efforts." It’s big-picture thinking. Yoshida already liked the idea of Sony and Oculus calling attention to each other’s efforts, but adding the Facebook name to the mix broadens the duo’s exposure. "More people will know about VR!"
- Shuhei Yoshida, head of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Worldwide Studios.

"We meant to validate Oculus by announcing Morpheus, and the Oculus guys knew what we were working on. I think they were waiting for us to make the announcement, so it would be Sony and Oculus together," he explains backstage at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. "But now Oculus being acquired by Facebook is helping to validate our efforts." It’s big-picture thinking. Yoshida already liked the idea of Sony and Oculus calling attention to each other’s efforts, but adding the Facebook name to the mix broadens the duo’s exposure. "More people will know about VR!"

- Shuhei Yoshida, head of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Worldwide Studios.

  • Engadget
High-res Meet Pocket Printer: a miniature robotic printer that rolls on paper
From The Verge:

Would you replace your desktop printer with a tiny robot that prints by creeping across a sheet of paper? Zuta Labs, which recently launched the Pocket Printer on Kickstarter, hopes so. The Pocket Printer, fundamentally, is a robotic Ouija planchette containing an inkjet printer head. Place it on a piece of paper, and it will slowly roll across it with an omnidirectional wheel system, printing as it goes. Currently, it can sync with computers, and the team is working on an Android and iOS app; it’s supposed to be a printer you can take anywhere, although most people would probably just leave it on a desk in lieu of the standard box.

Read more by clicking on the source link.
Image credit: Zuta Labs

Meet Pocket Printer: a miniature robotic printer that rolls on paper

From The Verge:

Would you replace your desktop printer with a tiny robot that prints by creeping across a sheet of paper? Zuta Labs, which recently launched the Pocket Printer on Kickstarter, hopes so. The Pocket Printer, fundamentally, is a robotic Ouija planchette containing an inkjet printer head. Place it on a piece of paper, and it will slowly roll across it with an omnidirectional wheel system, printing as it goes. Currently, it can sync with computers, and the team is working on an Android and iOS app; it’s supposed to be a printer you can take anywhere, although most people would probably just leave it on a desk in lieu of the standard box.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Image credit: Zuta Labs

High-res On the heels of app scam, Google announces ‘Verify Apps’ program to make Android safer
From ReadWrite:

Earlier this week, Android users were rocked when they discovered a hot new app that had rocketed to the top of the Google Play charts was a total fake. The app—Virus Shield—promised security protection for apps that users had downloaded on their Android devices. The problem? Virus Shield didn’t actually do anything. It was a paid app ($3.99) that didn’t do what it claimed to do. Google has since pulled it from the Google Play store.
Android users have a natural—if not totally justified—fear for the security of the apps they download on their devices. In the wake of the NSA’s spying scandal, reports of poor security on Android and more recently Heartbleed, Internet users have developed a semi-rational paranoia about whether or not apps and websites do exactly what they say they do.
To reassure Android users that security is still a primary focus at Google, the company today announced a new update to its “Verify Apps” program that continuously scans apps both on Google Play and on users devices to ensure they’re behaving in the way they are supposed to, even after the app has already been downloaded

Read more by clicking on the source link.

On the heels of app scam, Google announces ‘Verify Apps’ program to make Android safer

From ReadWrite:

Earlier this week, Android users were rocked when they discovered a hot new app that had rocketed to the top of the Google Play charts was a total fake. The app—Virus Shield—promised security protection for apps that users had downloaded on their Android devices. The problem? Virus Shield didn’t actually do anything. It was a paid app ($3.99) that didn’t do what it claimed to do. Google has since pulled it from the Google Play store.

Android users have a natural—if not totally justified—fear for the security of the apps they download on their devices. In the wake of the NSA’s spying scandal, reports of poor security on Android and more recently Heartbleed, Internet users have developed a semi-rational paranoia about whether or not apps and websites do exactly what they say they do.

To reassure Android users that security is still a primary focus at Google, the company today announced a new update to its “Verify Apps” program that continuously scans apps both on Google Play and on users devices to ensure they’re behaving in the way they are supposed to, even after the app has already been downloaded

Read more by clicking on the source link.