iPhone 6 review: giving the people what they want
Yet there’s nothing truly ambitious here, no grand vision of the future or of a new way of living in the present. Apple doesn’t have better ideas about how to make use of more display real estate, or how to help users navigate a bigger device. It’s not on the precipice of offering a new kind of do-it-all computer, as it might be with the iPhone 6 Plus. The latest iPhones could have been a chance for Apple to really re-examine what smartphone hardware should be, but Apple just built a bigger iPhone. Because that’s what people wanted.
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iPhone 6 review: giving the people what they want

Yet there’s nothing truly ambitious here, no grand vision of the future or of a new way of living in the present. Apple doesn’t have better ideas about how to make use of more display real estate, or how to help users navigate a bigger device. It’s not on the precipice of offering a new kind of do-it-all computer, as it might be with the iPhone 6 Plus. The latest iPhones could have been a chance for Apple to really re-examine what smartphone hardware should be, but Apple just built a bigger iPhone. Because that’s what people wanted.

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The $3.2 Billion Man: Can Google’s Newest Star Outsmart Apple?
Hang around Fadell and you’ll hear these types of complaints all the time. They’re what first drove the former Apple senior VP known for his work on the original iPod and iPhone to start Nest Labs in 2010, a company that focuses on redesigning what he and cofounder Matt Rogers label “unloved” objects of the home. Their first product, a smart thermostat that syncs with your phone and learns your usage patterns to conserve energy, won accolades for its sleek design; they followed it up last year with the Nest Protect, a smoke and carbon monoxide detector that’s evolving to become just as intuitive. The products flew off the shelves at Amazon and Apple stores, and in January, Google stunned the technology industry when it agreed to acquire Nest for $3.2 billion.
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The $3.2 Billion Man: Can Google’s Newest Star Outsmart Apple?

Hang around Fadell and you’ll hear these types of complaints all the time. They’re what first drove the former Apple senior VP known for his work on the original iPod and iPhone to start Nest Labs in 2010, a company that focuses on redesigning what he and cofounder Matt Rogers label “unloved” objects of the home. Their first product, a smart thermostat that syncs with your phone and learns your usage patterns to conserve energy, won accolades for its sleek design; they followed it up last year with the Nest Protect, a smoke and carbon monoxide detector that’s evolving to become just as intuitive. The products flew off the shelves at Amazon and Apple stores, and in January, Google stunned the technology industry when it agreed to acquire Nest for $3.2 billion.

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Track your sleep and activity on the cheap with Misfit’s ‘Flash’
Your average wrist-worn fitness tracker, a molded piece of rubber with a handful of accelerometers and gyroscopes inside, costs around $100 at the low-end. For someone who’s not sure if they need or want such a device, that’s pretty steep. Misfit Wearables, which debuted its first fitness tracker, the Shine, last year, is lowering that barrier with a new option called Flash. Priced at $50, it’s cheaper even than erstwhile cheapie Fitbit Zip. Like the latter, the Flash tracks steps, distance, and calories. Unlike the Zip, it also tracks sleep, as well as swimming and cycling activities with help from its companion smartphone app.
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Track your sleep and activity on the cheap with Misfit’s ‘Flash’

Your average wrist-worn fitness tracker, a molded piece of rubber with a handful of accelerometers and gyroscopes inside, costs around $100 at the low-end. For someone who’s not sure if they need or want such a device, that’s pretty steep. Misfit Wearables, which debuted its first fitness tracker, the Shine, last year, is lowering that barrier with a new option called Flash. Priced at $50, it’s cheaper even than erstwhile cheapie Fitbit Zip. Like the latter, the Flash tracks steps, distance, and calories. Unlike the Zip, it also tracks sleep, as well as swimming and cycling activities with help from its companion smartphone app.

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Pioneer is spinning off its DJ hardware business to focus on cars
If you’ve been in a club at any point in the last couple decades, odds are very good your ears have been exposed to Pioneer music equipment: its CDJ decks and DJM mixers are something of a standard in DJ booths around the world (so much so, in fact, that competing decks and controllers often strive to match the feel of the CDJ’s jog wheel). But now, Pioneer’s selling that iconic part of its business to private equity firm KKR so it can focus on its automotive electronics unit, a burgeoning business thanks in part to the launches of Apple’s CarPlay and Google’s Android Auto (Pioneer has committed to supporting both). The deal is valued at around ¥59 billion, roughly $551 million.
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Pioneer is spinning off its DJ hardware business to focus on cars

If you’ve been in a club at any point in the last couple decades, odds are very good your ears have been exposed to Pioneer music equipment: its CDJ decks and DJM mixers are something of a standard in DJ booths around the world (so much so, in fact, that competing decks and controllers often strive to match the feel of the CDJ’s jog wheel). But now, Pioneer’s selling that iconic part of its business to private equity firm KKR so it can focus on its automotive electronics unit, a burgeoning business thanks in part to the launches of Apple’s CarPlay and Google’s Android Auto (Pioneer has committed to supporting both). The deal is valued at around ¥59 billion, roughly $551 million.

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Panasonic puts a 1-inch sensor and a Leica lens on new CM1 smartphone

Panasonic has made the biggest news of Photokina so far with the announcement of its new Lumix CM1 Android smartphone. The Japanese company quit making smartphones after the failure of its Eluga handsets two years ago, but now it’s returning with an imaging-focused device that’s as much camera as it is phone. The CM1 comes with a 1-inch sensor that dwarfs most imaging sensors in smartphones today and is on a par with what you’d find inside Sony’s RX100 and Nikon’s 1 Series of cameras. It has a 20-megapixel resolution and is paired with an f/2.8 Leica lens, a mechanical shutter, and a manual control ring. Interestingly, the lens extends out of the body, but is not a zoom lens, its adjustments are purely for focusing purposes.

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Chinese city opens ‘phone lane’ for texting pedestrians
In Chongqing, China, with a degree of seriousness that has yet to be determined, the city authorities have designated a 30 metre (100ft) “cellphone lane” for people who use their phones while walking. “First mobile phone sidewalks in China,” declares a notice next to it.
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Chinese city opens ‘phone lane’ for texting pedestrians

In Chongqing, China, with a degree of seriousness that has yet to be determined, the city authorities have designated a 30 metre (100ft) “cellphone lane” for people who use their phones while walking. “First mobile phone sidewalks in China,” declares a notice next to it.

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Custom Ultra-Limited PS4 Air Jordans Cost $950

The recent resurgence of sneaker culture is at an all time high. And it’s not just because folks are once again lining up in droves for Nike’s coveted retro releases. There’s a new excitement building and it’s being brought to the community by buyers who create custom pieces. The “JRDN 4 X PS4″ is an amazing custom that combines the classic Air Jordan 4 silhouette with design influences from Sony’s PlayStation 4 . The creative mind behind this custom pair of “jays” is Jonny Barry from FreakerSNEAKS.

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MIT’s cheetah-inspired robot can leap and bound
Moment’s lenses add versatility to your iPhone camera, for a price
Moment, a new company from one of the founders of Contour Camera, launched a crowdfunding campaign earlier this year to develop and produce two new accessory lenses for smartphones: the Moment Wide and Moment Tele. The Moment lenses seperate themselves from the rest of the field with their machined metal and glass construction and unique, bayonet style mounting system. The Moment lenses aren’t cheap — they are shipping now for $99.99 each from Moment’s online store — but they promise to offer better quality than anything else on the market.
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Moment’s lenses add versatility to your iPhone camera, for a price

Moment, a new company from one of the founders of Contour Camera, launched a crowdfunding campaign earlier this year to develop and produce two new accessory lenses for smartphones: the Moment Wide and Moment Tele. The Moment lenses seperate themselves from the rest of the field with their machined metal and glass construction and unique, bayonet style mounting system. The Moment lenses aren’t cheap — they are shipping now for $99.99 each from Moment’s online store — but they promise to offer better quality than anything else on the market.

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Toyota tests ride-sharing with its adorable electric vehicles
"The sharing economy" is a buzzword that’s thrown around to talk about services like AirBnB and Lyft, and now it looks as if Toyota wants in on the trend. The automaker is putting 70 electric cars into commission in France, half of them being i-Road EVs, as spotted by Gizmodo. Instead of competing with the existing public transit system that’s in place, however, Toyota says this will work alongside the city of Grenoble’s infrastructure making the likes of one-way trips, among other things, easier.
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Toyota tests ride-sharing with its adorable electric vehicles

"The sharing economy" is a buzzword that’s thrown around to talk about services like AirBnB and Lyft, and now it looks as if Toyota wants in on the trend. The automaker is putting 70 electric cars into commission in France, half of them being i-Road EVs, as spotted by Gizmodo. Instead of competing with the existing public transit system that’s in place, however, Toyota says this will work alongside the city of Grenoble’s infrastructure making the likes of one-way trips, among other things, easier.

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