Flying cars are here but regulations keep them grounded
"A flying car is the ideal solution for middle-distance travel of up to 700 kilometres," Stefan Klein, chief technical officer for Aeromobil, told online magazine Dezeen. "According to our calculations, there is no better or more efficient solution for door-to-door travel."
Along with Juraj Vaculik, Aeromobil’s CEO, Klein contends that shifting road traffic to the air may be necessary to make personal transportation sustainable. 
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Flying cars are here but regulations keep them grounded

"A flying car is the ideal solution for middle-distance travel of up to 700 kilometres," Stefan Klein, chief technical officer for Aeromobil, told online magazine Dezeen. "According to our calculations, there is no better or more efficient solution for door-to-door travel."

Along with Juraj Vaculik, Aeromobil’s CEO, Klein contends that shifting road traffic to the air may be necessary to make personal transportation sustainable. 

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Post-it Notes now have a productivity app to capture your scribbles
Even with all of the digital options, Post-it Notes are still a handy way to jot things down for future reference. To help you keep those small pieces of paper organized and with you at all times, 3M released the Post-it Plus app for iOS. Capable of capturing up to 50 of the squares at once with the camera on an Apple device, the software allows to you sort by category and share with your fellow collaborators for further brainstorming.
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Post-it Notes now have a productivity app to capture your scribbles

Even with all of the digital options, Post-it Notes are still a handy way to jot things down for future reference. To help you keep those small pieces of paper organized and with you at all times, 3M released the Post-it Plus app for iOS. Capable of capturing up to 50 of the squares at once with the camera on an Apple device, the software allows to you sort by category and share with your fellow collaborators for further brainstorming.

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MIT’s underwater robot can sniff out contraband hidden underneath ships
That object above might look like a benign, slightly deformed bowling ball, but it’s actually something far more advanced. It’s an aquatic robot designed by a couple of MIT researchers, which can surreptitiously inspect the hulls and propeller shafts of ships at port to bust anyone trying to smuggle contraband. The device is perfect for the job, not only because it’s small, but also because it doesn’t leave visible bubble trails as it moves underwater. Also, its propulsion system’s housed within the permeable half of the device itself, so it can potentially hide in clumps of algae to avoid being spotted without getting itself tangled when it starts up. The other half is watertight and houses its circuits, batteries, antenna and other electrical components.
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MIT’s underwater robot can sniff out contraband hidden underneath ships

That object above might look like a benign, slightly deformed bowling ball, but it’s actually something far more advanced. It’s an aquatic robot designed by a couple of MIT researchers, which can surreptitiously inspect the hulls and propeller shafts of ships at port to bust anyone trying to smuggle contraband. The device is perfect for the job, not only because it’s small, but also because it doesn’t leave visible bubble trails as it moves underwater. Also, its propulsion system’s housed within the permeable half of the device itself, so it can potentially hide in clumps of algae to avoid being spotted without getting itself tangled when it starts up. The other half is watertight and houses its circuits, batteries, antenna and other electrical components.

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Consumer Reports tests Apple’s iPhone 5 and 6 for bends against Android rivals
The company’s line is that the iPhone is more than tough enough to exist in your pocket, as well as undergo potentially worse rigors of activity. Now Consumer Reports has published its own comparison using one of the same tests we saw — the three-point bend test. That’s when phones are held up at two points, while a bar comes down on the middle of the phone, and pressure is applied to see how much it can take before bending.
The product reviews company did this to one model of each the iPhone 5, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus, along with an HTC One M8, LG G3, and Samsung Galaxy Note 3. The goal was to see how much pressure each model could take before bending, as well as completely separating from the case. The big takeaway, it seems, is that 2012’s iPhone 5 held up better than both the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.
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Image credit: Consumer Reports

Consumer Reports tests Apple’s iPhone 5 and 6 for bends against Android rivals

The company’s line is that the iPhone is more than tough enough to exist in your pocket, as well as undergo potentially worse rigors of activity. Now Consumer Reports has published its own comparison using one of the same tests we saw — the three-point bend test. That’s when phones are held up at two points, while a bar comes down on the middle of the phone, and pressure is applied to see how much it can take before bending.

The product reviews company did this to one model of each the iPhone 5, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus, along with an HTC One M8, LG G3, and Samsung Galaxy Note 3. The goal was to see how much pressure each model could take before bending, as well as completely separating from the case. The big takeaway, it seems, is that 2012’s iPhone 5 held up better than both the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.

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Image credit: Consumer Reports

Inside the building where Apple tortures the iPhone 6

“We’ve designed the product to be incredibly reliable throughout all your real world use,” Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing Phil Schiller told me. “And in designing that we then have to validate heavily, and see how does it live up to real world use, and what are the forces and pressures on it, and how do you measure and prove that you’ve delivered on a specification.”

In case you hadn’t guessed, Apple doesn’t often show this facility to outsiders. The only reason I’m here today is because Apple’s latest iPhone, the iPhone 6, bends. At least for some people. The real question up until now is just how many people that’s happening to, and whether that would happen during normal use in a human pocket.

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 Samsung puts on its designer suit: Galaxy alpha review 

Instead of tacky chrome accents on cheap plastic, the Alpha has a real metal frame. It looks an awful lot like a smaller and thinner Galaxy S5 — because that’s what it is — but the way that it feels is dramatically different. I first laid my hands on the Galaxy Alpha at IFA earlier this month and was immediately hooked by its svelte and subtle design. For the first time ever, I was drawn to a Samsung phone because of its design, not in spite of it. The last member of Samsung’s expansive smartphone family to even come close to such status was the Galaxy S II, which came out more than three years ago. The Alpha is, therefore, aptly named as the inaugurator of what may be a brave new era for Samsung.

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"With normal use a bend in iPhone is extremely rare and through our first six days of sale, a total of nine customers have contacted Apple with a bent iPhone 6 Plus. As with any Apple product, if you have questions please contact Apple."
Apple responds to accusations that the iPhone is prone to bending

"With normal use a bend in iPhone is extremely rare and through our first six days of sale, a total of nine customers have contacted Apple with a bent iPhone 6 Plus. As with any Apple product, if you have questions please contact Apple."

Apple responds to accusations that the iPhone is prone to bending

Getting stuff done: BlackBerry Passport review

Consumers long ago abandoned BlackBerry smartphones for greener, app-filled pastures. But even the company’s traditionally strong enterprise position is being overtaken. Why carry a BlackBerry I don’t enjoy using when I can access all of my company’s data and tools on the iPhone or Android phone I already have? BlackBerry’s response: double-down on productivity all over again.

The $249 ($599 unlocked) Passport is the biggest, squarest, most in your face BlackBerry the company has ever produced. It’s the culmination of everything BlackBerry has ever done, a productivity powerhouse more comfortable in the boardroom than in the living room. (It even looks like it’s wearing a suit.) Other smartphones are often criticized for not being efficient productivity tools, but the Passport’s sole focus is on getting work done.

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Tilt Brush Is Like Microsoft Paint For The Year 2020
Facebook, Samsung, and Sony are all producing immersive, virtual reality headsets. We already know what that means for video games, but how might VR change digital creation? Tilt Brush gives us a taste of this brave new world.
In development by rapid prototyping studio Skillman & Hackett, Tilt Brush is a 3-D sketching app. A user dons a VR headset like an Oculus Rift, and they’re transported to a world where a line is no longer confined to two dimensions, but can snake in space like a sculpture. It’s an experience designed to be immersive, complete with light painting brushes that look like you’re drawing with pure magic.
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Tilt Brush Is Like Microsoft Paint For The Year 2020

Facebook, Samsung, and Sony are all producing immersive, virtual reality headsets. We already know what that means for video games, but how might VR change digital creation? Tilt Brush gives us a taste of this brave new world.

In development by rapid prototyping studio Skillman & Hackett, Tilt Brush is a 3-D sketching app. A user dons a VR headset like an Oculus Rift, and they’re transported to a world where a line is no longer confined to two dimensions, but can snake in space like a sculpture. It’s an experience designed to be immersive, complete with light painting brushes that look like you’re drawing with pure magic.

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