Showing 1290 posts tagged tech

High-res "When we blew through our goal and actually doubled it on the first day, you changed my life. I will never forget that. This is just the beginning of a long road towards our goal of rescuing the music, all of it, from Cab Calloway to Sinatra, the Beatles and Rolling Stones, to Nirvana and Patti Smith, to Jay Z and Rihanna, and beyond."
Neil Young on raising over $6 million during his Pono music player’s Kickstarter campaign.

"When we blew through our goal and actually doubled it on the first day, you changed my life. I will never forget that. This is just the beginning of a long road towards our goal of rescuing the music, all of it, from Cab Calloway to Sinatra, the Beatles and Rolling Stones, to Nirvana and Patti Smith, to Jay Z and Rihanna, and beyond."

Neil Young on raising over $6 million during his Pono music player’s Kickstarter campaign.

High-res At ATAP, simple things like Lego blocks represent ridiculously complex ideas. This tiny group of engineers and designers has given itself the task of creating a phone with several unproven, next-generation technologies. They intend to make a phone cheap enough to be accessible to 5 billion people. To do so, they need to create an ecosystem of hardware manufacturers robust enough that it could literally challenge giant incumbents like Foxconn and even Samsung. The head of Project Ara, Paul Eremenko, says he is planning “the most custom mass-market product ever created by mankind” without a trace of irony in his voice.
Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone

At ATAP, simple things like Lego blocks represent ridiculously complex ideas. This tiny group of engineers and designers has given itself the task of creating a phone with several unproven, next-generation technologies. They intend to make a phone cheap enough to be accessible to 5 billion people. To do so, they need to create an ecosystem of hardware manufacturers robust enough that it could literally challenge giant incumbents like Foxconn and even Samsung. The head of Project Ara, Paul Eremenko, says he is planning “the most custom mass-market product ever created by mankind” without a trace of irony in his voice.

Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone

High-res "We meant to validate Oculus by announcing Morpheus, and the Oculus guys knew what we were working on. I think they were waiting for us to make the announcement, so it would be Sony and Oculus together," he explains backstage at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. "But now Oculus being acquired by Facebook is helping to validate our efforts." It’s big-picture thinking. Yoshida already liked the idea of Sony and Oculus calling attention to each other’s efforts, but adding the Facebook name to the mix broadens the duo’s exposure. "More people will know about VR!"
- Shuhei Yoshida, head of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Worldwide Studios.

"We meant to validate Oculus by announcing Morpheus, and the Oculus guys knew what we were working on. I think they were waiting for us to make the announcement, so it would be Sony and Oculus together," he explains backstage at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. "But now Oculus being acquired by Facebook is helping to validate our efforts." It’s big-picture thinking. Yoshida already liked the idea of Sony and Oculus calling attention to each other’s efforts, but adding the Facebook name to the mix broadens the duo’s exposure. "More people will know about VR!"

- Shuhei Yoshida, head of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Worldwide Studios.

  • Engadget
High-res Meet Pocket Printer: a miniature robotic printer that rolls on paper
From The Verge:

Would you replace your desktop printer with a tiny robot that prints by creeping across a sheet of paper? Zuta Labs, which recently launched the Pocket Printer on Kickstarter, hopes so. The Pocket Printer, fundamentally, is a robotic Ouija planchette containing an inkjet printer head. Place it on a piece of paper, and it will slowly roll across it with an omnidirectional wheel system, printing as it goes. Currently, it can sync with computers, and the team is working on an Android and iOS app; it’s supposed to be a printer you can take anywhere, although most people would probably just leave it on a desk in lieu of the standard box.

Read more by clicking on the source link.
Image credit: Zuta Labs

Meet Pocket Printer: a miniature robotic printer that rolls on paper

From The Verge:

Would you replace your desktop printer with a tiny robot that prints by creeping across a sheet of paper? Zuta Labs, which recently launched the Pocket Printer on Kickstarter, hopes so. The Pocket Printer, fundamentally, is a robotic Ouija planchette containing an inkjet printer head. Place it on a piece of paper, and it will slowly roll across it with an omnidirectional wheel system, printing as it goes. Currently, it can sync with computers, and the team is working on an Android and iOS app; it’s supposed to be a printer you can take anywhere, although most people would probably just leave it on a desk in lieu of the standard box.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Image credit: Zuta Labs

High-res On the heels of app scam, Google announces ‘Verify Apps’ program to make Android safer
From ReadWrite:

Earlier this week, Android users were rocked when they discovered a hot new app that had rocketed to the top of the Google Play charts was a total fake. The app—Virus Shield—promised security protection for apps that users had downloaded on their Android devices. The problem? Virus Shield didn’t actually do anything. It was a paid app ($3.99) that didn’t do what it claimed to do. Google has since pulled it from the Google Play store.
Android users have a natural—if not totally justified—fear for the security of the apps they download on their devices. In the wake of the NSA’s spying scandal, reports of poor security on Android and more recently Heartbleed, Internet users have developed a semi-rational paranoia about whether or not apps and websites do exactly what they say they do.
To reassure Android users that security is still a primary focus at Google, the company today announced a new update to its “Verify Apps” program that continuously scans apps both on Google Play and on users devices to ensure they’re behaving in the way they are supposed to, even after the app has already been downloaded

Read more by clicking on the source link.

On the heels of app scam, Google announces ‘Verify Apps’ program to make Android safer

From ReadWrite:

Earlier this week, Android users were rocked when they discovered a hot new app that had rocketed to the top of the Google Play charts was a total fake. The app—Virus Shield—promised security protection for apps that users had downloaded on their Android devices. The problem? Virus Shield didn’t actually do anything. It was a paid app ($3.99) that didn’t do what it claimed to do. Google has since pulled it from the Google Play store.

Android users have a natural—if not totally justified—fear for the security of the apps they download on their devices. In the wake of the NSA’s spying scandal, reports of poor security on Android and more recently Heartbleed, Internet users have developed a semi-rational paranoia about whether or not apps and websites do exactly what they say they do.

To reassure Android users that security is still a primary focus at Google, the company today announced a new update to its “Verify Apps” program that continuously scans apps both on Google Play and on users devices to ensure they’re behaving in the way they are supposed to, even after the app has already been downloaded

Read more by clicking on the source link.

High-res As a limited time offer, Google will allow anyone in the US to buy Glass
From The Verge:

Google is about to make its biggest push yet to get Glass in the hands of as many people as possible. The Verge has obtained documents indicating that the company will open up its “Explorer Program” and make Glass available to anyone who wants to purchase a pair, possibly as soon as next week. It’ll be a limited-time offer, only available for about a day, and only US residents will be eligible to purchase the $1,500 device. Google will also include a free sunglass shade or one of its newly-introduced prescription glasses framesalong with any purchase. An internal Google slide shows that the promotion may be announced on April 15th, though all the details of this program have yet to be finalized.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

As a limited time offer, Google will allow anyone in the US to buy Glass

From The Verge:

Google is about to make its biggest push yet to get Glass in the hands of as many people as possible. The Verge has obtained documents indicating that the company will open up its “Explorer Program” and make Glass available to anyone who wants to purchase a pair, possibly as soon as next week. It’ll be a limited-time offer, only available for about a day, and only US residents will be eligible to purchase the $1,500 device. Google will also include a free sunglass shade or one of its newly-introduced prescription glasses framesalong with any purchase. An internal Google slide shows that the promotion may be announced on April 15th, though all the details of this program have yet to be finalized.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Project Ara: Google’s guide for building different types of modular smartphones

From The Verge:

Google is starting to show developers what they need to do to create swappable parts for its upcoming modular smartphones, currently called Project Ara. On Ara’s website, it’s just posted the Module Developers Kit, which contains the information that manufacturers need to get started creating modular parts. “Ara’s success is predicated on a rich, vibrant, and diverse ecosystem of modules from a myriad of developers,” one document in the kit reads.

Ara phones begin as no more than a skeleton, before owners plug in everything from a display and processor to a camera and Wi-Fi unit in order to complete them. Google wants many of those modules — including some unorthodox ones — to come from third-party developers. Google previously announced that it would begin working with developers later this month at a virtual conference that begins next week. Now, eager developers will actually be able to take a look beforehand to get a head start going in.

The crux of the guide is a large document that breaks down what Ara phones will look like and how modules can fit in. As previously detailed, the guide explains the three sizes of phone skeletons that Ara will allow for: mini, medium, and large. 

Read more by clicking on the source link.

High-res Google in the living room: Leaked documents suggest Android TV is coming soon
From Ars Technica

On Saturday, The Verge posted a number of screenshots from a document that it says reveals Google’s latest endeavor: Android TV. Yes, this would be Google’s second attempt to make its way into the living room, the first being the Google TV platform that debuted in 2010 and died slowly over the next couple years.
Android TV, which The Verge says will consist of streamlined apps on an “extremely simple” set-top box interface, is apparently well into development, with “major video app providers” already building apps for it. “Android TV is an entertainment interface, not a computing platform,” Google writes, according to The Verge. “It’s all about finding and enjoying content with the least amount of friction.”

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Google in the living room: Leaked documents suggest Android TV is coming soon

From Ars Technica

On Saturday, The Verge posted a number of screenshots from a document that it says reveals Google’s latest endeavor: Android TV. Yes, this would be Google’s second attempt to make its way into the living room, the first being the Google TV platform that debuted in 2010 and died slowly over the next couple years.

Android TV, which The Verge says will consist of streamlined apps on an “extremely simple” set-top box interface, is apparently well into development, with “major video app providers” already building apps for it. “Android TV is an entertainment interface, not a computing platform,” Google writes, according to The Verge. “It’s all about finding and enjoying content with the least amount of friction.”

Read more by clicking on the source link.

High-res Audi plans to include tablets in its cars in the near future
From ReadWrite:

“It will be a full-blown Android tablet,” Brad Stertz, corporate communications manager for Audi of America, told me. The Audi Smart Display docks into the back of headrests for use by backseat passengers—a passenger-oriented extension of the “infotainment” systems automakers have been pushing into central consoles for the past few years. “This is not just theory,” said Stertz. “It’s headed to a future model. We haven’t said what year, but it will be coming.”  
Stertz says the tablet’s arrival is four to five years away at the latest—essentially one product-planning cycle for the auto industry. The only problem: That’s more like four or five product cycles for the tech industry.

Read more by clicking on the source link.
Image credit: Wallpaper Magazine

Audi plans to include tablets in its cars in the near future

From ReadWrite:

“It will be a full-blown Android tablet,” Brad Stertz, corporate communications manager for Audi of America, told me. The Audi Smart Display docks into the back of headrests for use by backseat passengers—a passenger-oriented extension of the “infotainment” systems automakers have been pushing into central consoles for the past few years. “This is not just theory,” said Stertz. “It’s headed to a future model. We haven’t said what year, but it will be coming.”  

Stertz says the tablet’s arrival is four to five years away at the latest—essentially one product-planning cycle for the auto industry. The only problem: That’s more like four or five product cycles for the tech industry.

Read more by clicking on the source link.

Image credit: Wallpaper Magazine